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August 2013 Archives

Michigan town adopts non-discrimination ordinance

The small village of Oshtemo Township in the state of Michigan adopted a non-discrimination ordinance on Aug. 27 that will soon take place in the local town's workforce. A vote of 6 to 1 was able to capture the success of this ordinance, which many are calling a step in the right direction. According to the town's law, the ordinance must be published within three days and will come into effect 30 days after that.

Michigan court upholds employee rights for state workers

A Michigan court upheld a controversial right-to-work law that bans union fees as a condition of employment in the state. Employee rights were cited as the reason, but Michigan's heavily unionized work force saw the decision as a political strike against labor unions. The judges split 2-1 on the legality of the measure, a law that saw protests by thousands of union workers at the Capitol.

Amputee wins discrimination case against FBI

Michigan readers may take an interest in the following account of an amputee who recently won a discrimination case against the FBI. The man was asked to leave training camp allegedly over concerns about his ability to shoot a gun because he has a prosthetic hand. The man alleged that he was the victim of workplace discrimination by the FBI.

Employee fired after being trapped in Gaza violence

A man who was fired from his job with a Detroit automaker in 2007 after he was stranded in Gaza has sued for discrimination. In 2007, a product engineer for a major Detroit automaker was approved for an extended leave of absence beginning June 1. Before the man left for the Middle East, the man's manager shortened his leave to three weeks because of a scheduled product build.

Superior Court rules against discriminated workers

After a group of 22 cocktail servers brought a weight-discrimination lawsuit against their former employer, a superior court judge ruled against them. Michigan is the only state in the U.S. that expressly prohibits workplace discrimination based on height or weight, and the New Jersey judge upheld the legality of treatments that the workers claimed were unfair.