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Posts tagged "civil rights"

Employment opportunity rights granted to Michigan citizens

The Michigan Civil Rights Commission ensures that citizens of Michigan do not face unlawful discrimination at their workplace. The federal law provides citizens with employment rights along with certain services to ensure the protection of these civil rights.

Equal pay laws applicable to Michigan employees and employers

Today we Michiganders live in a world where women are equally involved in professions that were traditionally thought to be male dominated. Though more and more women have joined the workforce in Detroit, they still earn significantly less than their male counterparts. This disparity is more pronounced for women who are disabled or belong to an ethnic minority.

Methods for Michigan women to deal with wage discrimination

According to the Equal Pay Act, all employers must pay similar wages to both men and women who perform similar tasks at the workplace. Equal pay, in this context, refers to all wages and benefits including salary, overtime, bonus, insurance, stock options and other entitlements.

Michigan may soon implement new workplace discrimination law

Michigan is an equal opportunity state. The Michigan Civil Rights Commission (MCRC) was set up to receive complaints against and take action when any reports are filed regarding discrimination based on race, sex etc. Any discrimination in places of employment, housing and education are prohibited by this Michigan law. Complaints can be made on the grounds of height, sex, race, age, marital status etc. MCRC also has the power and authority to order appropriate remedies after investigating the complaints.

App launched to fight discrimination in Michigan

Many workers in Detroit, Michigan unnecessarily suffer every day because of workplace discrimination. Hostility in the workplace can affect an employee's morale and productivity and may result in resignation. Although reporting discriminatory practices may be the wisest decision, there are still risks involved, including retaliation and termination. Fortunately, technology can help ease the reporting of workplace discrimination.

Michigan business execs want gender discrimination banned

Under employment law, it is unlawful to discriminate employees based on gender, race, religious belief or physical disability. Unfortunately, many employees across the United States, including in Michigan, suffer from discrimination based on sexual orientation. Now some state business leaders think it is time for one of the last areas of discrimination to be outlawed.

Muslims claims DHL practiced workplace discrimination in firings

In an action that Muslim workers in Detroit might find relevant, a group of Somali Muslim DHL Global Mail employees are claiming religious discrimination because the delivery company reversed its policy of flexible break times, which initially allowed them to stop work for the five-minute prayers required by their religion. The Islamic employees accused DHL of worker discrimination after the company fired two dozen of them, allegedly for pausing in their duties to say the prayers, which had previously been allowed. One fired employee made $11.57 per hour to sort mail and said that he had never received any negative comments about his work.

Restaurant employee files discrimination complaint

A Maryland woman has filed a complaint against Hooters, the restaurant chain with locations in Michigan and around the country, claiming that she was unfairly discharged from her position as a waitress at the Baltimore location. The complaint was filed with the Maryland Commission on Civil Rights.

Supreme Court clarifies standards for class certification

The Supreme Court's 2011 ruling in Wal-Mart v. Dukes is fast becoming the new seminal citation for employers seeking to prevent employment discrimination plaintiffs from gaining class certification. In the case underlying the Wal-Mart decision, the plaintiffs alleged Wal-Mart engaged in a pattern of systemic gender discrimination, which prevented women from advancing out of lower-paying jobs at a much higher rate than their male associates. Wal-Mart claimed it had a strong anti-discrimination policy and pointed to its local managers, including those in its Detroit stores, who made all personnel decisions.

Transgender discrimination in the workplace

People in Michigan and elsewhere are probably not surprised to hear that although gender discrimination is prohibited under federal law, transgender individuals still face discrimination in the workplace. A 2011 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ruling established that gender identity is protected under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.