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Facebook under fire for racial discrimination

| Oct 28, 2020 | Workplace Discrimination |

Racial discrimination in the workplace happens in Michigan and throughout the United States. Recently, a black Facebook employee filed a claim of racial discrimination against the social media giant, and this is not the first time the company has been accused of racially-biased practices.

On June 25, 2020, the Facebook employee filed his racial-discrimination claim with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, alleging that Facebook tends not to hire blacks, and even when it does, it does not provide the same kind of advancement opportunities as it does to whites and Asians. Two individuals who were interviewed but not hired by Facebook are backing the man’s claim, alleging that Facebook declined to hire them because they’re black.

The man also alleges that he endured a hostile work environment that “limited his career advancement.” Even though his managers told him he was doing a great job, the man claims, they would consistently write performance reviews that did not merit promotion. This kind of passive discrimination is both common and unlawful.

The lawsuit comes on the heels of a not-so-flattering diversity report, which stated that under 4% of all Facebook personnel are black, with Asians and whites constituting the vast majority of the company’s employees.

The unfortunate reality is that, in many instances in this country, American culture has yet to catch up to American values. Everybody has a right to equal opportunity, the right to a fair chance, but not everyone gets it. Anyone experiencing workplace discrimination should consult an experienced attorney who is versed in employment law. Workplace discrimination is a systemic, cultural problem. People who experience this kind of injustice are entitled to and deserve compensation, and an experienced attorney is a good start.

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