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How can you tell if you are a victim of discrimination at work?

On Behalf of | Mar 24, 2022 | Employees' Rights |

Do you know when mistreatment at work turns into discrimination? Are you wondering if you have been a victim of workplace discrimination?

If so, you aren’t alone. Unfortunately, millions of people fall victim to discrimination based on age, race, or another factor. Knowing for sure if discrimination is at play is a must to know what options you have.

Tell-tale signs of workplace discrimination

It’s worth noting that workplace discrimination can occur in many ways. However, some situations are more common than others.

In most cases, if you feel as though you are being discriminated against at work, you have legal options. Some of the signs this may be happening to you (and others in your workplace) include:

  • Unfair disciplinary actions
  • Unequal wages based on race, sex, etc.
  • Inappropriate interview questions
  • Being passed over for promotions
  • Belittling or inappropriate comments or communications

How to handle discrimination at work?

Handling discrimination at work can be tricky. It’s smart to start by reporting the situation to management or the company’s HR department. In many companies, the issue can be handled at this level.

However, if the discrimination continues, it’s essential to understand that you have legal rights. It’s a good idea to document the discrimination as it happens to have a record to use if you pursue legal action.

The first step is to report the discrimination to the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission (EEOC) within 180 days of the occurrence. After doing this, you have the option to move forward with a lawsuit against your employer. This can be a long and difficult process, but if discrimination occurs and neither management nor the HR department will take action, it may be the only recourse you have.

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