Protecting Your
Workplace Rights
And Interests
  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Employment Contracts
  4.  » Discrimination-based termination: doing something about it

Discrimination-based termination: doing something about it

| May 19, 2020 | Employment Contracts |

You might be an employee who can just sense it. Supervisors and work team leads who used to be friendly and inclusionary are now aloof and chilly in their interactions. Work duties that have long been yours are now being peeled away and assumed by co-workers. You used to chair certain meetings that you are no longer even invited to. The exemplary ratings you are accustomed to now feature numbers linked with subpar performance.

What’s going on?

Your instincts that the workplace is now hostile rather than supportive and nurturing toward you might be spot on.

And you would hardly be alone in that assessment. Many employees in Michigan and nationally sense an on-the-job freeze out, with their instincts on the matter being flatly accurate.

This question naturally arises when negativity is clearly aimed at you in the workplace: What are you going to do about it?

We answer that query at the established Bloomfield Hills legal offices of Sterling Employment Law by stressing what a concerned employee should avoid doing in response.

Namely, that is being passive and letting management dictate the shots. We stress on our website that companies often “have teams of lawyers guiding supervisors, managers and human resources staff on how to terminate an employee.”

Shouldn’t you have committed and aggressive attorneys advocating for you when your job is on the line?

Workers’ positions are threatened every day by employers acting with bad-faith motives that are discriminatory and unlawful. A proven employment legal team can diligently respond to that through effective negotiation or, when necessary, recourse to trial.

Your job is supremely important. You have every right to protect it through alliance with a dedicated attorney team that will make diligent efforts to promote your best interests.

Archives

FindLaw Network