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Think twice before you sign that executive-level contract

| Jan 8, 2019 | Employment Contracts |

If you are on the hunt for an executive-level position, you might be tempted to take the first offer that comes your way — especially if you really want to work for a particular company. No matter how excited you are about your prospects, however, it is usually wiser to wait a little before signing a contract. This gives you some time to review its terms and decide whether you should accept the contract as written or negotiate for better terms.

In the executive world, negotiation is common, even between prospective employees and employers. Some companies even expect potential employees to make a counteroffer after reviewing their employment contracts — so they never put their best offer out front right away. However, many people looking for a career position fear that negotiating will hurt their chances of securing the job of their dreams.

As employment attorneys, we have seen many employees agree to unfair terms simply because they did not want to lose out on a distinguished opportunity. Our lawyers want to encourage all Detroit executives to seek professional advice about their proposed employment contracts before making any decisions.

For those just entering the executive community in Michigan, legal guidance can help identify areas in a contract that leave you vulnerable in some way. Working with an experienced firm provides up-and-coming executives with sound advice on how to negotiate safely for a fairer employment agreement.

When should you negotiate better terms in an employment contract? Ultimately, the decision to negotiate further is yours and yours alone. However, seeking a legal opinion before you sign is your right. Doing so may keep you from making a mistake that you’ll later regret. Let us help you evaluate a contract to see if there are any areas that could be slanted unfairly against you.

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