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Things you may not know about age-based workplace discrimination

| Oct 11, 2017 | Workplace Discrimination |

Many people in the modern world think that they cannot be surprised any longer. Being a worldly and knowledgeable society, it is easy to see why people think this way. However, there are several key points about age-related workplace discrimination in Michigan and elsewhere that may actually astonish you.

Why is it important to know about these points? It is important because knowledge is always the best way to begin making changes. With that lofty goal in mind, here are some surprising things about age-based workplace discrimination in America.

  • Employers may still legally ask you about your age.
  • According to a study, workers over the age of 50 are typically more engaged in their jobs than younger workers are.
  • In 2009, a Supreme Court ruling made it so that plaintiffs have a “higher burden of proof” for age-related discrimination than is required for other types of workplace discrimination.
  • When asked, eight out of 10 older Americans say Congress should make stronger anti-age discrimination laws.
  • Age-related workplace discrimination is 100 percent against the law in all of the United States.
  • More than one in five of the workplace discrimination complaints received by the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC) involve age discrimination.

The good news is that your hands are not tied if you are a victim of workplace discrimination based on your age. The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) can assist you in filing a charge against your employer. An employment attorney can also fill an important role by providing you with sound advice about your situation as well as the possibility of filing a discrimination lawsuit.

Source: AARP.org, “10 Things You Should Know About Age Discrimination,” accessed Oct. 11, 2017

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