Protecting Your
Workplace Rights
And Interests
  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Workplace Sexual Harassment
  4.  » Is your boss making unwanted sexual advances toward you?

Is your boss making unwanted sexual advances toward you?

On Behalf of | Jun 18, 2022 | Workplace Sexual Harassment |

Unwelcome sexual advances can make your job unbearable. It can be even more distressing if they are coming from your superior, someone with the power to affect the direction of your career.

Sexual harassment is prohibited by both federal and state laws, although it remains prevalent in the workplace. You should stand up against the vice if you are a victim and protect your rights. Here is what you need to know about supervisory sexual misconduct.

Quid pro quo sexual harassment

There is a name for sexual harassment perpetrated by someone in a position of authority – quid pro quo sexual harassment.

For instance, your job promotion could rest on giving in to their desires even if you are deserving or qualified. In addition, you might face adverse actions when you do not comply with unsolicited sexual advances. In extreme cases, you could be let go or denied benefits.

What can you do about it?

The first thing you ought to do is inform your employer about the harassment you are undergoing. You can raise the matter through your human resource department or someone in a higher position than your supervisor. Remember to have some form of evidence to back your claims.

If your employer does nothing about it and the harassment persists, it may be time to contact the relevant agencies for further action. In Michigan, that would be the Michigan Department of Civil Rights or the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) if your employer has more than 15 employees.

Possible remedies

The agency will investigate your case and act accordingly depending on the facts. For instance, your employer may be directed to reinstate you if you have been dismissed. Alternatively, they may be ordered to pay back any wages or benefits you missed out on as a result of the sexual harassment.

Ultimately, the most important thing is that you get justice by holding your boss accountable for their actions while at the same time protecting your interests and well-being at work.

Archives

FindLaw Network